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eSchool of Graduate PME - Resources: Video Creation and Sharing

Video Creation and Sharing

The resources below will help you create and share videos that clearly communicate your original thoughts. Although the resource videos address more of the technical side of video creation, it's important to know your thoughts and communication skills matter MORE than your ability to create "highly-polished" videos. In other words, focus most of your efforts on your content and delivery, not on the technical aspects of video production. Your videos are simply a way to communicate with fellow learners and course instructors. You can be confident in your assignments if you have a strong message and clear delivery.

The resource videos are organized into four sections: (1) Planning, (2) Recording, (3) Editing and (4) Sharing.

Planning

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SPEAKING: A Minute With John Maxwell (1:28)

In this short video, John shares his thoughts on "speaking." He is an internationally recognized leadership expert, speaker and author who has sold over 19 million books. His organizations have trained more than 5 million leaders worldwide.
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4 Essential Body Language Tips (2:27)

Dananjaya shares four essential body language tips. He has been a competitive public speaker for the past ten years and in 2014 he became The World’s Number One through Toastmasters International.
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The 7 Cs of Communication (3:34)

This video presents the 7Cs as a checklist to help you craft well constructed and clear messages. Consider these checklist points as you prepare your assignments and before you begin recording.

Recording

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How to Make Videos with your Phone (3:34)

Sunny shares five important aspects of recording video on a smartphone, however, most of these tips can be applied to any video recording device: (1) framing, (2) stability, (3) lighting, (4) audio and (5) set.
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Making YouTube Videos with Your Smartphone (4:33)

Although the title refers to YouTube videos, Roberto's advice easily applies to any video. It's also worth noting his video was done in one shot without editing. More importantly, he makes a great case for the value of "content" and "clarity" over fancy cameras, lights and microphones.
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How to Record Your First YouTube Video with a PC (6:09)

Although the title refers to YouTube videos, this tutorial is essentially about video recording using a PC. Specifically, Brighton demonstrates how to create a video using Windows Movie Maker on a Windows 7 computer (desktop or laptop) equipped with a built-in or external webcam and a built-in or external microphone. This concept works the same for computers running Windows 8 and 10.

    Operating System: Windows 7. Cost: Free.

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How to Record Your First YouTube Video with a Mac (4:21)

Although the title refers to YouTube videos, this tutorial is essentially about video recording using a Mac. Specifically, Brighton demonstrates how to create a video using Apple Photo Booth on a Mac laptop running Mac OS X. He also shares a few techniques for positioning the webcam (laptop). An external webcam and microphone are not needed as Mac laptops come equipped with a built-in webcam and microphone.

    Operating System: Mac OS X. Cost: Free.

Editing

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How to Download Windows Movie Maker (5:43)

This video demonstrates how to download and install Windows Movie Maker 2012 on a PC running Windows 8.1. Movie Maker is also compatible with Windows 7 and 8. Movie Maker isn't available for Windows RT 8.1 and Windows RT.

    Operating Systems: Windows 7, 8 and 8.1. Cost: Free.

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Windows Movie Maker 2012 Tutorial (Split and Trim) (3:31)

This video demonstrates how to split and trim video clips in Windows Movie Maker 2012. This editor is free and compatible with Windows 7, 8 and 8.1. It isn't available for Windows RT 8.1 and Windows RT.

    Mobile Operating Systems: Android, iOS and Windows 10 Mobile. Cost: In-App Purchases.

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Easy Video Editor App for any Phone (9:17)

Luria walks you through Videoshop, a smartphone application for editing video. Videoshop is fully functional editor available for most smartphone operating systems. It can also upload directly to YouTube, saving the hassle of pulling it into a computer for editing.

    Mobile Operating Systems: Android, iOS and Windows 10 Mobile. Cost: In-App Purchases.

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Editing Video With QuickTime Player (4:18)

Gary shows you how to use QuickTime Player (Mac OS X) for very simple video editing. QuickTime Player lets you combine trimming, append more video clips, and split video clips to arrange and export edited videos.

    Operating System: Mac OS X. Cost: Free.

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Edit Videos Using the YouTube Video Editor (0:50)

If you use YouTube to share your video assignments, consider using their web-based editor. It's free and easy to use with a modern web browser no matter the operating system or device.

Sharing

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Video Formats (2:57)

This video introduces some common types of video formats, explains the difference between "containers" and "files," while providing guidance on which format to use based on a specific situation.
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Upload and Share a File on Dropbox (3:34)

This video shows how to upload and share a file on Dropbox. Dropbox provides free file storage. You can upload your video assignment and share the link with fellow students and course instructors—even if they don't have Dropbox. They can use the link to view your video through their web browser.
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How to Upload to YouTube (1:07)

Jason demonstrates how to upload videos to your YouTube account. He also shares tips on changing your default privacy settings, checking the progress of your uploads and uploading videos longer than 15 minutes.
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What are Video Privacy Settings on YouTube? (1:06)

Lindsay explains the YouTube privacy settings (i.e., public, unlisted, private). She also covers how you can easily make changes to manage who has access to view your uploaded videos.

Important Note: If you post a video assignment to any social media site (e.g., YouTube), set the privacy settings so only individuals with the link can see it. Avoid settings that require the use of a password, as this will cause viewing issues among fellow students and course instructors. For example, if sharing in YouTube, use the "unlisted" setting. The "unlisted" video can be viewed through the shared link without a password.